EXERCISE FOR MANAGING ADOLESCENT SCOLIOSIS
David Woodbridge, Functional Physio, in conjunction with Vert Mooney, MD

THE JOURNAL OF MUSCULOSKELETAL MEDICINE – March 2007
Vert Mooney, MD
David Woodbridge, Functional Physio, PT

EXERCISE FOR MANAGING ADOLESCENT SCOLIOSIS
Contrary to current dogma, the condition may be corrected with this therapy.

ABSTRACT:
Patient compliance is a significant problem in exercise therapy and bracing for adolescent scoliosis and exercise has been considered to have no therapeutic benefit. According to recent studies, however, muscle function asymmetry is a consistent finding in patients with this condition and is correctable with progressive resistance exercises. Patients’ baseline and progress can be quantified accurately with exercise by performing precise measurements of torso rotation and lumbar strengthening. Strengthening is associated with control of scoliotic curves, if they are below the operative level. Because even some decrease in the amount of curve may be expected, this form of therapy may be as beneficial as bracing. The treatment may be used for controlling pain in older patients with scoliosis. (J Musculoskel Med. 2007;24:107-115).
For the full study go to >> Adolescent Scoliosis study [this is a pdf]

IMPACT OF SPECIFIC MUSCULAR STRENGTH THERAPY ON PATIENTS WITH CHRONIC LOWER BACK PAIN. 2010
Professor John Carlson, PhD
Director Centre for Ageing, Rehabilitation, Exercise and Sport
Victoria University, Australia.
Geoffrey MacKay, B.App Sci. [Human Performance], B App Sci. [Physiotherapy]. Director, Physiotherapy, Middle Park Physiotherapy, Australia.

ABSTRACT:
Objectives: To measure the impact of a specific isolated lumber extension exercise protocol for patients with chronic lower back pain.
Design, setting and participants: Prospective cohort study of 55 patients with chronic low back pain who were referred for muscular strength testing and therapy at a Muscular Strength Therapy [MST] clinic in Melbourne, Australia.
Interventions: A specialised clinical joint testing and exercise therapy machine isolated the lumbar spine of patients who attended over 6 weeks with bi-weekly exercise therapy sessions. The isolated lumbar spine was exercised to exhaustion.
Main Outcome Measures: Changes in strength measurements of the lower back in males and females from pre- to post- treatment and evaluation of changes in perceptions of back pain and disability.

Results:

After 12 specific isolated and exhaustive lumbar exercise therapy sessions both the males and females showed significant increases in strength at all angles of back extension across the measured range of movement (P≤ .05). The mean percentage increase in lumbar strength was 41.1 % for the males and 48.8% for the females.Accompanying these improvements in strength was a mean 48.8% reduction in the Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire score recorded for the group (P≤ .05).
Conclusion: These results demonstrate that specific isolated lumbar testing and accompanying muscular strength therapy can target and quantify beneficial clinical changes in patients with chronic lower back pain.
For the full study go to >> Impact of specific muscular strength therapy on patients with chronic lower back pain. [pdf]

MEDX RESEARCH
MedX is recognized as the gold standard for treating and reducing chronic back pain and dysfunction through specific spinal strengthening. Over the past 15 years, the Universities of Florida and San Diego, along with various orthopedic clinics around the world, have published some of the most compelling research to date. This research shows that specific spinal strengthening exercises using the MedX Lumbar and Cervical Extension Machines help people get better, even after multiple failed attempts at other forms of treatment.
With more than 40 published articles in peer-reviewed journals, the proof lies in both the research and the testimonials of thousands of people around the world.
For further information see Medex Website